You Must Read- Integrating Marine with Architecture (A New Light for Urban Splatter)

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shedd-aquarium

The true goal behind this website is to unite a community of people with a common interest in architecture. Like the header says, I want to bring architecture to you. My dreams for this website are bigger than reality, but hopefully the spark will ignite. I write this website to express my passion for mainly architecture. I have two main passions. One being architecture, and also as you may know I have a passion (or maybe an obsession) for marine life, especially in the amazonian species. I plan on somehow working with possibly designing exclusive fish tanks. I plan on starting as an architect, for economic reasons. Designing aquariums will best suite both of my passions in architecture and marine life. So now that you know my future life story lets move onto The Shedd Aquarium in Chicago Illinois.

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Amazon Fishtank (freshwater angel fish and discus fish, my favorite fish)

Fish tanks are tranquil and I would argue therapeutic. That’s why you see fish tanks in nursing homes and doctors offices. I went to the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago today and the line was unbelievable, and the tickets were outrageously priced ($35). While down the street at the Museum of Science and Industry or the Art Museum there was virtually no line at all. People go to the Aquarium because its instant visually dynamic beauty. Whats better than witnessing such diverse life taking place in the basis of all life (water). Some artists like acrylic, others like ceramic, while my favorite is the aquarium. You can showcase so much more within an aquarium than you ever could using non-living materials. I strongly urge everyone to have some sort of marine life of their own. If you want the best exploration experiences for your children, then buy them a fish tank. Seriously, comment if you agree!

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Well, maybe I should talk about the building housing the aquariums. The building was constructed from 1927-1930. Formally known as the John G. Shedd Aquarium. John Shedd only lived long enough to see the architect’s initial drawings of the building, as he died before it was constructed, but his wife lived to cut the ribbon during the grand opening. As you walk into the grand entrance you notice the really cool antique light fixtures with octopuses surrounding them. Even the ceiling tiles have inlets of aquatic species. Overall the building’s architecture inspired me, because of its aquatic details and grand aquatic structures. 

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The octopus lights!
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Aquatic species within the light fixture, how cool!

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