Tuesday, August 11, 2020

Gdansk Poland Town Hall Architecture

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Overall height: 83.45 m

Floors: 5

Start of construction: 1346

The main town hall in Gdansk is a Gothic – Renaissance style, situated at the junction of Długa Street and Długi Targ Street. The building is the second highest building in the Main City, after St. Mary’s Church.

The first major expansion of the town hall building began in 1378 when the city had changed its system of government which required separation between the city council and the municipal branch. In the years 1454-1457, in connection with the arrival of King Kazimierz Jagiellończyk to Gdańsk, the town hall was also expanded. During the reconstruction, the attic was added, and the front elevation was replaced.

On October 3, 1556, a fire broke out in the town hall which seriously damaged its construction. The reconstruction of the building was influenced by Dutch Renaissance architects and master-builders, including Wilhem van den Meer, Dirk Daniels, and Anthony van Obberghen.

During WW2, Gdańsk was bombarded several times by Allied airplanes. During the war in March 1945, the fire consumed the tower’s helmet and wooden ceilings, and the walls were additionally affected by missiles and bombs. The fragments that survived were so weak that even a simple storm threatened a catastrophe. According to preliminary findings, the building was not suitable for reconstruction and was qualified for demolition. Ultimately, however, it was saved and adapted to the Museum.

During the war in Gdańsk, the interiors of valuable monuments were evacuated. Furniture and paintings were hidden in the Pomeranian villages. The Town Hall was carefully rebuilt after the war and has undergone many restorations.

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