Resin driveways: How good are they really?

June 1, 2022

Resin driveways: How good are they really?

You may have seen the trend for resin driveways popping up on people’s home reno feeds and adorning the front of fashionable new pads in your area. And if you’re about to install a new driveway or redo your old one, you may be thinking a resin version is the way to go. But how good are they really? Are they as practical and durable as they are attractive? Or is it just a passing fad? Let’s take a look.

What is a resin driveway?

A resin driveway is made from a mix of aggregate material and resin. Which admittedly, doesn’t sound all that attractive. But this aggregate is usually formed as decorative pieces of stone, which are held in place with the resin. The resin is essentially the glue. Together this creates a surface that looks a bit like gravel but provides a much more solid base for your car.

There are two ways to create a resin driveway, so you may see them referred to as resin bond or resin bound. The bonded version is where the stones are laid on top of the resin and the bound version is where the two materials are mixed together before they’re laid. The difference? Essentially, the second option shouldn’t have any loose stones.

So, now you know what a resin driveway is. But are they any good?

The pros and cons

As with any hard surface, there are pros and cons to installing a resin driveway. But we’ll start with the positives. If you’re looking to add curb appeal without blowing the budget, then it’s a good option to go for. You’ll find resin driveway prices are pretty reasonable compared to more traditional alternatives. And if you go for a resin bond instead of bound, you’ll find the total cost per square is even less. With a choice of grey and beige stone colors, this type of driveway suits modern and traditional looking homes, making it a versatile choice. In terms of durability, look after it and it could last you a couple of decades or more.

Of course, it isn’t all good news. Resin bonded driveways do require a drainage system and some maintenance to keep it looking good. And you may find this material works better on flat driveways than sloped ones.

How do they compare to other types of driveways?

Just like poured concrete and tarmac, resin can easily fill any size or shape of drive. This makes it ideal for surfacing an awkward-shaped driveway, creating a sweeping entrance or a bespoke design. And although you can color concrete and tarmac, resin driveways do generally look more appealing in tone and texture. Of course, personal taste will play a part in your decision.

In terms of being hard-wearing, you may find that resin driveways don’t have such a big advantage. Tarmac and concrete versions are likely to stand up to heavy vehicles and constant usage much better than resin does.

Another thing to consider is the availability of reputable installers in your area. Concrete and tarmac have been around for a long time, so you’re likely to find no end of companies ready to create your new driveway using these materials. But resin installers may not be so common. This will mean it’s harder to get yourself a good deal with skilled trades.

 

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Thomas P
I believe in making the impossible possible because there’s no fun in giving up. Travel, design, fashion and current trends in the field of industrial construction are topics that I enjoy writing about.

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