How To Remove Stains From Orlando Granite Countertops

July 18, 2022

For so long, you’ve dreamt of a beautiful kitchen complete with all the gadgets, gizmos, and, of course, a marvelous granite countertop. But now that you have it, you don't even want your family to lay anything on top of it for fear of ruining its remarkable sheen.

You don't have to worry a bit. Unlike wood, laminate, or tile, granite is highly durable and low-maintenance. You can have a party and a feast with your friends; as long as you know how to take care of your granite countertop, you'll be fine.

What Is Granite?

Granite is a type of intrusive igneous rock that’s formed when molten rock cools and solidifies. The composition of granite is mainly quartz, mica, and feldspar. Developing this type of rock takes thousands of years, and its hardness and density can be compared to diamond. That’s why cutting slabs of granite rock in quarries takes a diamond cutter to ensure a clean cut is created.

High-quality granite can be found in Brazil, Italy, India, Spain, and China. In the United States, 43% of homeowners prefer granite for their kitchen countertops because of granite's elegant quality and durability.

If you wish to acquire the best kinds of granite countertops, Orlando granite countertops are the best in the market today. Caring for your granite countertop is relatively easy. You need to remember the following rules:

  • Clean spills as soon as you see them
  • Don’t use any harsh chemicals in cleaning the surface
  • Never use abrasive cleaners to prevent damaging the protective seal
  • Never use vinegar, lemon, lime, or any cleaners with acid in the ingredient in cleaning the countertop
  • Have your guests use coasters
  • Always use kitchen boards when doing meal preps
  • Clean it every day to prevent build-up

Cleaning your granite countertop should be done daily while deep cleaning and disinfecting must be done at least three times a week. Use mild dish soap, hot water, and a kitchen towel for daily cleaning.

To disinfect the granite countertop, you may prepare a mixture of one part water, one-part isopropyl alcohol, a teaspoon of dish soap, and a few drops of your favorite mild essential oil; mix well and place in a spray bottle. Many homemakers love the combined scent of eucalyptus and lavender as it makes a calming and clean scent that’d be nice in your kitchen.

To disinfect your countertop, spray the mixture, leave for at least five minutes to ensure the mixture will take action, and disinfect the surface; finally, use a microfiber towel to clean the surface. You'll notice that your granite countertop will glimmer and shine since the mixture you made has all the necessary ingredients to make it as such.

Now, moving to the hard part, removing stains.

1. Oil Based Stains

For oil-based stains like cosmetics, grease, peanut butter, and creams, you may try a mixture of mild dish soap with a few drops of acetone or ammonia. Avoid scrubbing the surface with anything abrasive like steel wool or hard scrubbing pads.

If the first trick doesn't work, try making a poultice paste. A poultice paste is baking soda mixed with water to create a thick paste. Leave a layer of paste on the surface, cover with plastic wrap and leave for 24- 48 hours, ensuring that no air will get inside to dry out the paste by taping the edges of the plastic wrap. After the recommended period, you'll notice the stain will disappear, and you'll only have to remove the remaining poultice mixture on the surface with a damp towel.

2. Organic Stains

If you have a light-colored countertop and red wine, coffee, or tea spilled on top of it, don't panic. Use 12% hydrogen peroxide and a few drops of ammonia, which will take the stains out. Again, if this won't work, the poultice paste previously mentioned will do the trick.

3. Hard Water Stains

You might notice white marks near your sink, which could be more visible if you have dark granite countertops. If you live in an area where hard water is ordinary, this will be a problem you'll often see. You may use a piece of brand-new blade and gently scrape the surface in an angled position to ensure you're only removing the hardened mineral deposits and not blatantly scratching the surface.

Make sure to use protective materials like rubber gloves to prevent hurting yourself. After removing the mineral deposits, use mild dish soap and warm water to thoroughly clean the surface.

4. Ink Stains

Your child might be playing with the permanent marker and unknowingly drew a star on your countertop. Don't fret and get angry. For lighter-colored granite countertops, you may use hydrogen peroxide while you may try lacquer thinner for dark-colored ones.

Conclusion

Taking care of a granite countertop isn’t rocket science, and removing stains is pretty straightforward as long as you know the essential hacks and techniques. You don't even have to buy commercially produced cleansers that’d more than likely damage the protective covering of your expensive granite countertop. The poultice paste will surely be your go-to method, so having a box of baking soda at home will always be handy.

 

Categories: ,  

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Thomas P
I believe in making the impossible possible because there’s no fun in giving up. Travel, design, fashion and current trends in the field of industrial construction are topics that I enjoy writing about.

LEGAL

Welcome to Urban Splatter, the blog about eccentric luxury real estate and celebrity houses for the inquisitive fans interested in lifestyle and design. Also find the latest architecture, construction, home improvement and travel posts.

SHOPPING

linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram